Nepal

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Nepal

The remote mountain Kingdom of Nepal contains more of the world’s highest mountains than any other country and is dominated by the soaring snow-covered peaks of the Himalayas.

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Your Nepal trekking holiday can take in fascinating Hindu and Buddhist temples and pagodas, at their best in the capital Kathmandu. Alternatively, begin your Nepal trekking holiday in the North, where Pokhara is a gateway to the breathtaking Annapurna range where winding paths link rural villages and yak pastures.

A prominent factor in a Nepali’s everyday life is religion. The Nepalese still follow age-old customs of Hindu and Buddhist religious practices. Adding colour to the lives of Nepalis are festivals the year round which they celebrate with much pomp and joy. It is said that Nepal has more festivals than there are days in the year.

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Quick Facts

Capital
Kathmandu

Population
31 million

Area
147,181 sq km (56,827 sq miles)

Major Languages
Nepali

Major religion 
Hinduism, Buddhism

Monetary Unit 
Nepalese rupee

Flight time from London
13hrs

Time Difference 
GMT + 5:45

When to go 
Climatic conditions within Nepal vary from one place to another in accordance with the geographical features. In the north, summers are cool and winters severe, while in the south summers are sub-tropical and winters mild. The monsoon that brings rain from June through September affects most of the country except those that lie in the rain-shadow areas like Mustang which is within Nepal but a part of the Tibetan plateau.

The climate changes rapidly from the sub-tropical terai to the cool dry temperate and alpine conditions in the northern Himalayan ranges within a short span of 200 km. In the terai, which is the hottest part of the country, summer temperatures rise above 45°C. The climate here is hot and humid. In the middle hills, the summer climate is pleasant with temperatures around 25°C – 27°C.

The winter temperatures range from 7°C to 23°C in the terai and sub-zero to 12°C in the mountainous regions, hills and valleys. The northern Himalayan region has an alpine climate with temperatures reaching below -30°C. The valley of Kathmandu has a pleasant climate with an average summer and winter temperatures of 19°C – 27°C and 2°C – 12°C respectively.

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Highlights

Annapurna Region

The legendary Annapurna region is the most diverse and popular trekking area in Nepal. From the full three-week Annapurna Circuit, which stretches into the historic Mustang region to short three-day treks, there’s a trek suitable for everyone here.

As the name suggests, the centre piece of this part of Nepal is the range of mountains that includes Annapurna I, the first of the 8,000 m peaks to be climbed. Also included in this region is another 8,000 m giant, Dhaulagiri, which is located west of Annapurna I.

Between these two mountains lies the valley of the Kali-Gandaki River, the deepest gorge in the world.

Views of lush, fertile farmland and undisturbed natural forest, snow covered mountains, and encounters with a mixture of many ethnic communities, all add up to a diverse range of experiences that make this area one of the most satisfying trekking destinations in Nepal.

The fact that the Annapurna chain of mountains lies inland causes a large chunk of land to fall in the rain shadow area.

Hence these parts are considerably drier than the southern slopes of the mountains. This leads to unusually diverse landscapes and the possibility of trekking during the monsoon.

Kathmandu Valley

Discover ancient temples and myths in the valley of gods where Hinduism and Buddhism meet.

Smell and eat traditional Newari food cooked on wood ovens while you are strolling through the small little alleys around the “durbar squares” in one of the ancient king cities of the Kathmandu Valley; Bhaktapur, Patan or Kathmandu. Buy handicrafs from artisans that still work according to centuries-old traditions or try if you are talented yourself in one of the many workshops that are available. Watch how the people of the valley still use their temples to practice rituals that have been passed from generation to generation. Discover the temples of the valley, learn more about the rituals of the people of Nepal and visit seven monuments of UNESCO World Heritage Site Kathmandu in 48 hours.

There is a famous folk story that narrates the establishment of the Kathmandu Valley. Long ago, during the Pleistocene era, Kathmandu Valley was merely a lake – a beautiful exhibition of aquatic flora and fauna. Around the same era, when Manjushree, a holy Buddhist Saint from Tibet, saw a beautiful lotus flower floating in the center of the lake, boundless admiration started to flame inside his heart, which evoked his devotion to hold and worship the flower. He, then, cut the Chobar Hill; that ‘cut’ turned into a deep gorge, letting lake water drain out, and leaving a fertile, and pious land for human settlement. Later the settlement became a well-known terminal for diverse individuals; for devotees (both Hindus and Buddhists), Tibetan and Indian merchants, artisans, emperors, explorers, historians, hippies, according to the respective eras, and – now – for tourists from all around the world.

The Kathmandu Valley has always been a melting pot for various cultures, religions, and arts and crafts. The Gopala and Kirat dynasties ruled at the earliest periods, followed by the Licchavi (300-879 AD), who, correspondingly, decorated the city with a passion, traditional art, and religious belief. For such reasons, till this date one can experience the authenticity of the valley, its cultural and religious harmony; the varieties of temples of Hinduism and Buddhism that are standing next to each other for centuries, diverse ethnicities, colorful festivals, and celebration, but just within a walking distance, which is, perhaps, the most beautiful highlight of the city.

The Kathmandu Valley envelops three glorious cities – Kathmandu, Patan, and Bhaktapur, which were once independent states ruled by the Malla kings, who ruled the cities from the 12th to the 18th centuries and decorated their individual kingdom with exotic craftsmanship and palaces. Back then, the mighty Mongol rulers would import craftsmen from the Kathmandu Valley to decorate their empire. That is to say, the famous Pagoda architecture is a gift from the Kathmandu Valley to the China. Now the Kathmandu Valley is home to seven sites which make the valley a UNESCO Cultural World Heritage Site, and also home to hundreds of other exquisite monuments, sculptures, artistic temples and magnificent art – reminders of the golden era in Nepal’s architecture.

Everest Region

Reach the highest point on earth or choose to live out your dream by standing at the foot of Mt. Everest (8,848 m).

The Everest region in Nepal is more than just trekking, it is a milestone in anyone’s life; and some have even described the experience as a journey close to Nirvana. Located in the northeast province of Nepal, this is a colony to dramatic glaciers, deep settlements, several majestic mountains.

Passing through legendary Sherpa villages, the trek is a mix of a deeply cultural and spiritual experience in addition to the physical one. Buddhist lamas, monks and nuns led by Rinpoches (reincarnate lamas) serve the predominantly Sherpa communities from gompas(monasteries).

The journey to Everest or Everest Base Camp, begins from Lukla, if you are taking a direct flight from the capital. However, for die-hard lovers of trekking, there is an another switchback starting from Jiri through the mid-hills of Solu; ethnically diverse and flora-rich.

Taking a flight is a time-saver, while trekking from Jiri gives you the opportunity to take in each tiny detail of the trek, with extra time to to meet the charming people and see the rich flora and fauna on the trail.

The option from Jiri will roughly take 10 days to reach the famous Sherpa village, Namche Bazaar (3,500m). The Sagarmatha National Park in the Khumbu is one of the few places on earth with the rarest bio-diversity and the highest and youngest mountain system in the world.

For those with sufficient time, a 10-12 day trek through Solu to the Khumbu and the Sagarmatha National Park is an excellent itinerary both in terms of acclimatization and to experience the changing customs, traditions, and lifestyles as you pass through lower altitude settlements to those in the higher altitudes.

A part of the Himalayan ecological zone, the park was added to the list of UNESCO Natural World Heritage Sites in 1979. The park contains three of the world’s seven highest mountains Sagarmatha or Mt. Everest, Lhotse, and Cho Oyu and is also home to several other prominent peaks most of which are above 6,000 meters.

Climbers and trekkers continue to trek to Everest Base Camp and not surprisingly the “Roof of the World” continues to be the scene of some of mountaineering’s most significant accomplishments and a favored haven for alpine enthusiasts.

The Everest region has been valued as the key to evolutionary history of the Earth, and is also a habitat for some rare and endangered species like snow leopard, red panda, Himalayan black bear, musk deer and Himalayan wolves.

Chitwan National Park

In the southern region of Nepal, the jungles of Chitwan National Park await you with wildlife experiences like no other. Track wild royal Bengal tigers and watch one-horned rhinos bathe in rivers alongside great Asiatic elephants. If you want to quench your thirst for nature, Chitwan National Park is where you should be.

Witness wilderness in its real form, and do it in style like the old-day Maharajas on elephant back to spot rhinos and deer, or go jeep safari in the depth of the forest to catch a glimpse of the elusive Bengal tiger.

Another, exciting adventure is to go canoeing in the marshy Terai river amongst hundreds of marsh mugger crocodiles basking in the sun, waiting for their prey to fall in their mouths.
You can also spend some calming animal time visiting the elephant and gharial breeding farms, a perfect way to educate your kids about the animals and their life cycle.

Be a part of the local tribal life and visit the Tharu village, where you are welcomed into their traditional mud houses and treated with utmost care and respect.
At the end of the day add to the essence of the ultimate jungle experience and unwind next to a huge campfire, to the sounds of the intricate Tharu stick dance and local folk songs.

The Chitwan National Park, Nepal’s first national park lies at the foot of the Mahabharat range in the inner Terai lowlands of Chitwan. Covering an area of 932 sq. km this is the most well preserved conservation area in all of Asia.
The park is rich in flora and fauna and has a fascinating variety of mammals and birds. The park preserves some of the last habitats for endangered species like the greater one-horned rhinoceros and the Royal Bengal tiger.

The reserve was designated a national park in 1973 and was listed as a UNESCO world Heritage sites.

Annapurna Region

The legendary Annapurna region is the most diverse and popular trekking area in Nepal. From the full three-week Annapurna Circuit, which stretches into the historic Mustang region to short three-day treks, there’s a trek suitable for everyone here.

As the name suggests, the centre piece of this part of Nepal is the range of mountains that includes Annapurna I, the first of the 8,000 m peaks to be climbed. Also included in this region is another 8,000 m giant, Dhaulagiri, which is located west of Annapurna I.

Between these two mountains lies the valley of the Kali-Gandaki River, the deepest gorge in the world.

Views of lush, fertile farmland and undisturbed natural forest, snow covered mountains, and encounters with a mixture of many ethnic communities, all add up to a diverse range of experiences that make this area one of the most satisfying trekking destinations in Nepal.

The fact that the Annapurna chain of mountains lies inland causes a large chunk of land to fall in the rain shadow area.

Hence these parts are considerably drier than the southern slopes of the mountains. This leads to unusually diverse landscapes and the possibility of trekking during the monsoon.

Kathmandu Valley

Discover ancient temples and myths in the valley of gods where Hinduism and Buddhism meet.

Smell and eat traditional Newari food cooked on wood ovens while you are strolling through the small little alleys around the “durbar squares” in one of the ancient king cities of the Kathmandu Valley; Bhaktapur, Patan or Kathmandu. Buy handicrafs from artisans that still work according to centuries-old traditions or try if you are talented yourself in one of the many workshops that are available. Watch how the people of the valley still use their temples to practice rituals that have been passed from generation to generation. Discover the temples of the valley, learn more about the rituals of the people of Nepal and visit seven monuments of UNESCO World Heritage Site Kathmandu in 48 hours.

There is a famous folk story that narrates the establishment of the Kathmandu Valley. Long ago, during the Pleistocene era, Kathmandu Valley was merely a lake – a beautiful exhibition of aquatic flora and fauna. Around the same era, when Manjushree, a holy Buddhist Saint from Tibet, saw a beautiful lotus flower floating in the center of the lake, boundless admiration started to flame inside his heart, which evoked his devotion to hold and worship the flower. He, then, cut the Chobar Hill; that ‘cut’ turned into a deep gorge, letting lake water drain out, and leaving a fertile, and pious land for human settlement. Later the settlement became a well-known terminal for diverse individuals; for devotees (both Hindus and Buddhists), Tibetan and Indian merchants, artisans, emperors, explorers, historians, hippies, according to the respective eras, and – now – for tourists from all around the world.

The Kathmandu Valley has always been a melting pot for various cultures, religions, and arts and crafts. The Gopala and Kirat dynasties ruled at the earliest periods, followed by the Licchavi (300-879 AD), who, correspondingly, decorated the city with a passion, traditional art, and religious belief. For such reasons, till this date one can experience the authenticity of the valley, its cultural and religious harmony; the varieties of temples of Hinduism and Buddhism that are standing next to each other for centuries, diverse ethnicities, colorful festivals, and celebration, but just within a walking distance, which is, perhaps, the most beautiful highlight of the city.

The Kathmandu Valley envelops three glorious cities – Kathmandu, Patan, and Bhaktapur, which were once independent states ruled by the Malla kings, who ruled the cities from the 12th to the 18th centuries and decorated their individual kingdom with exotic craftsmanship and palaces. Back then, the mighty Mongol rulers would import craftsmen from the Kathmandu Valley to decorate their empire. That is to say, the famous Pagoda architecture is a gift from the Kathmandu Valley to the China. Now the Kathmandu Valley is home to seven sites which make the valley a UNESCO Cultural World Heritage Site, and also home to hundreds of other exquisite monuments, sculptures, artistic temples and magnificent art – reminders of the golden era in Nepal’s architecture.

Everest Region

Reach the highest point on earth or choose to live out your dream by standing at the foot of Mt. Everest (8,848 m).

The Everest region in Nepal is more than just trekking, it is a milestone in anyone’s life; and some have even described the experience as a journey close to Nirvana. Located in the northeast province of Nepal, this is a colony to dramatic glaciers, deep settlements, several majestic mountains.

Passing through legendary Sherpa villages, the trek is a mix of a deeply cultural and spiritual experience in addition to the physical one. Buddhist lamas, monks and nuns led by Rinpoches (reincarnate lamas) serve the predominantly Sherpa communities from gompas(monasteries).

The journey to Everest or Everest Base Camp, begins from Lukla, if you are taking a direct flight from the capital. However, for die-hard lovers of trekking, there is an another switchback starting from Jiri through the mid-hills of Solu; ethnically diverse and flora-rich.

Taking a flight is a time-saver, while trekking from Jiri gives you the opportunity to take in each tiny detail of the trek, with extra time to to meet the charming people and see the rich flora and fauna on the trail.

The option from Jiri will roughly take 10 days to reach the famous Sherpa village, Namche Bazaar (3,500m). The Sagarmatha National Park in the Khumbu is one of the few places on earth with the rarest bio-diversity and the highest and youngest mountain system in the world.

For those with sufficient time, a 10-12 day trek through Solu to the Khumbu and the Sagarmatha National Park is an excellent itinerary both in terms of acclimatization and to experience the changing customs, traditions, and lifestyles as you pass through lower altitude settlements to those in the higher altitudes.

A part of the Himalayan ecological zone, the park was added to the list of UNESCO Natural World Heritage Sites in 1979. The park contains three of the world’s seven highest mountains Sagarmatha or Mt. Everest, Lhotse, and Cho Oyu and is also home to several other prominent peaks most of which are above 6,000 meters.

Climbers and trekkers continue to trek to Everest Base Camp and not surprisingly the “Roof of the World” continues to be the scene of some of mountaineering’s most significant accomplishments and a favored haven for alpine enthusiasts.

The Everest region has been valued as the key to evolutionary history of the Earth, and is also a habitat for some rare and endangered species like snow leopard, red panda, Himalayan black bear, musk deer and Himalayan wolves.

Chitwan National Park

In the southern region of Nepal, the jungles of Chitwan National Park await you with wildlife experiences like no other. Track wild royal Bengal tigers and watch one-horned rhinos bathe in rivers alongside great Asiatic elephants. If you want to quench your thirst for nature, Chitwan National Park is where you should be.

Witness wilderness in its real form, and do it in style like the old-day Maharajas on elephant back to spot rhinos and deer, or go jeep safari in the depth of the forest to catch a glimpse of the elusive Bengal tiger.

Another, exciting adventure is to go canoeing in the marshy Terai river amongst hundreds of marsh mugger crocodiles basking in the sun, waiting for their prey to fall in their mouths.
You can also spend some calming animal time visiting the elephant and gharial breeding farms, a perfect way to educate your kids about the animals and their life cycle.

Be a part of the local tribal life and visit the Tharu village, where you are welcomed into their traditional mud houses and treated with utmost care and respect.
At the end of the day add to the essence of the ultimate jungle experience and unwind next to a huge campfire, to the sounds of the intricate Tharu stick dance and local folk songs.

The Chitwan National Park, Nepal’s first national park lies at the foot of the Mahabharat range in the inner Terai lowlands of Chitwan. Covering an area of 932 sq. km this is the most well preserved conservation area in all of Asia.
The park is rich in flora and fauna and has a fascinating variety of mammals and birds. The park preserves some of the last habitats for endangered species like the greater one-horned rhinoceros and the Royal Bengal tiger.

The reserve was designated a national park in 1973 and was listed as a UNESCO world Heritage sites.

Where to stay

These are just a selection of the properties we can personally recommend. Please get in touch to hear more about our full portfolio.

Dwarika’s Kathmandu

The Dwarika’s Hotel emerged out of a family’s quest to preserve the unique architectural and cultural heritage of Nepal.

take me to Dwarika’s Kathmandu

Ker & Downey Lodges

Ker & Downey offers the finest, most complete adventure program in Nepal, enabling guests to experience all aspects of this wonderful exciting country.

take me to Ker & Downey Lodges

Meghauli Serai

Standing on the banks of the river Rapti, Meghauli Serai overlooks a vast expanse of rippling waters and the core of Chitwan National Park.

take me to Meghauli Serai

Get in touch with us now to start planning your journey

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