South Africa

All Destinations

South Africa

Historically, South Africa was the pariah of the world under its infamous apartheid regime, but caught the imagination of all with Nelson Mandela’s release from prison in 1991, followed by the peaceful, first democratic elections in 1994. Since then, it has become one of the top travel destinations in the world, blending elements of both ‘Africa of old’ with modernity.

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On the one hand, one can escape to wild, remote areas and experience exceptional game viewing and true wilderness. Then, just an hour’s flight away, there are modern cities and hotels that compete with the best in the world. With eleven official languages and a diverse range of cultures and ways of life, it is no wonder that Mandela has named South Africa ‘the rainbow nation’.

When it comes to wildlife and scenery, South Africa has a plethora of places to see, including a number of World Heritage Sites and incredible game reserves. Overshadowed by the dramatic Table Mountain and surrounded by the Atlantic, Cape Town is one of the world’s most picturesque cities. Visitors can sample fine wine under the grapes in the tranquil winelands, while the coastline of South Africa is enormous, offering superb scenery, such as sandy beaches and sheer, fynbos-covered cliffs of the Garden Route, as well as amazing wildlife opportunities, from southern right whales breaching off Cape Town to pristine coral reefs on the KwaZulu-Natal Coast.

Inland are the intriguing and moving battlefield sites that lay testament to both the Anglo-Zulu and the Anglo-Boer wars. Here too rise the Drakensberg Mountains where vultures ride on the thermals over deeply green valleys and jagged peaks.

To the east and the pride of South Africa’s natural heritage is the Kruger National Park. At 2 million hectares and over 300 kms long, this enormous area encompasses a savannah landscape with 147 mammal species, over 400 bird species and numerous reptiles, amphibians and insects.

From desert dunes to rolling farmlands, savannah bush, subtropical hardwood forests and superb white sand beaches, as well as game viewing to equal the best in Africa (including a host of small parks and reserves in the Northern Provinces and Eastern Capes) South Africa offers something to travellers of all persuasions.

After all, where else can you find penguins and elephants living in the same country?

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Quick Facts

Administrative Capital
Pretoria

Population
50.7 million

Area
1.22 million sq km (470,693 sq miles)

Major Languages
11 official languages including English, Afrikaans, Sesotho, Setswana, Xhosa and Zulu

Major religion 
Christianity, Islam, indigenous beliefs

Monetary Unit 
Rand

Flight time from London
11.5 hours to Johannesburg

Time Difference 
GMT + 2

When to go 
South Africa’s climate is sunny and temperature throughout the year. Durban and Kwa Zulu Natal have a summer rainfall, and can be extremely hot and humid, so the best time for visiting this area is late summer, the winter or early spring.

Game Viewing Times
The best time for game viewing are the dry winter months – June to September. (as it’s Southern hemisphere) Winter nights can be extremely cold on safari so warm clothes are essential.

Cape Town
Cape Town has a Mediterranean climate, with rains during the winter. So the best time for seeing the Cape and Table Mountain is the summer, which is the months November to March.

Botany and Flowers
The best time for flowers however is springtime, in either August or September. During winter (June – Sept) proteas can be seen growing wild in the Riviers-Onderend and Outeniqua mountains.

Whale Watching
Whale watching is best in the winter months which is June to Sept

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Highlights

Western Cape

It’s hard to choose highlights in the Western Cape for there are very few parts of the province that aren’t utterly gorgeous.

Being the first province to be colonised by Europeans it sits at the bottom of the country, including both the most southerly point on the African continent, Cape Agulhas, and the much more famous Cape of Good Hope where the Indian and Atlantic Oceans meet, just south of Cape Town.

Cape Town, furled around the slopes of Table Mountain, is considered to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world and is usually the first stop of choice on any tour of South Africa. There is enough here to keep you entertained for weeks, from headline sites such as Table Mountain and Robben Island to great museums and historic sights such as Government Avenue, shopping and strolling in Greenmarket Square, Long Street and the V&A Waterfront. There are plenty of fantastic restaurants, craft stalls and buskers to keep you entertained, with regularly spaced cocktail bars to stop you getting thirsty.

South of the city centre, on the Cape Peninsula, the area is filled with fabulous boutique hotels and restaurants, excellent mountain walks and drives such as Chapman’s Peak and Hoerikwaggo Trail. Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, long recognised as one of the finest in the world, show off the full glories of the Cape Floral Kingdom that have made this area a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Around the coast, small towns from Simonstown and Muizenberg to Hout Bay and Kommetjie provide excellent beaches, surfing, seafood restaurants and rummaging in antique and craft shops. And don’t forget to stop at Boulders Beach to hang out with the penguins.

Just inland of Cape Town, the rolling hills have been upholstered in vines. A trio of historic towns – Stellenbosch, Franschhoek and Paarl – stand at the heart of the Cape Winelands. Wine tastings are obviously a huge part of the Winelands experience, but there is so much more. Whether you want to pamper yourself with gourmet cuisine, a spa break or a round of golf, go hot air ballooning or horse riding through a Big 5 game reserve, these are all possible.

Beyond the Winelands rise the jagged Cederbergs, their cliffs and caves a natural art gallery decorated by the San for thousands of years.

Garden Route

Conveniently accessible from Cape Town, the Garden Route is famous for its hardy fynbos floral kingdom, its secluded little bays and its year-round holiday frame of mind.

Stretching from Heidelberg in the Western Cape to the Storms River in the extreme western reach of the neighbouring Eastern Cape, the name derives from the verdant and ecologically diverse vegetation encountered and the numerous lagoons and lakes dotted along the coast.

The main arterial highway of the Garden Route is the N2 which passes through towns such as Mossel Bay, Knysna, Oudtshoorn, Plettenberg Bay and Nature’s Valley and George, the Garden Route’s largest city and main administrative centre.

Ten nature reserves embrace the varied ecosystems of the area as well as unique marine reserves, home to soft coral reefs, bottlenose and common dolphin, seals and a host of other marine life including killer whales that frolic close to shore, especially near Plettenberg Bay. Various other bays along the Garden Route are nurseries to the endangered Southern Right Whale which come there to calve in the winter and spring (July to December).

Greater Kruger

The Greater Kruger is not only renowned for its diversity of wildlife, but also for its conservation record. You can see the famed Big 5, but you’ll also be dazzled by hundreds of birds, ancient trees, mighty rivers and much, much more.

Stretching 360km from north to south, the Kruger National Park is almost the size of Wales and the surrounding areas of unfenced game reserves include the famous Sabi Sands with some of South Africas most exclusive lodges, as well as the Timbavati, Makalali and Thornybush Reserves.

Sharing the wilderness with you are over 100,000 impala, 10,000 blue wildebeest, 9,000 kudu, 5,000 warthog, 25,000 zebra, 180 cheetah, over 1,000 leopard and 1,500 lions, and that’s just the start.

The Greater Kruger enjoys a great year-round sunny climate and offers all kinds of activities, from guided game drives and bush walks with an armed ranger to three night walking trails in deep wilderness areas.

KwaZulu Natal

Known as the Kingdom of the Zulu, KwaZulu Natal is a melting pot of African, European and Indian cultures.  The province stretches from the Drakensburg Mountains in the northwest to humid, sub-tropical coast in the southeast and boasts two World Heritage Sites, the iSimangaliso Wetland Park and the majestic Ukhahlamba-Drakensberg Park.  The battlefields of Zululand are filled with history, while the golden sandy beaches of Maputaland, in the far northeast, stretch for 200km along this glorious piece of coastline.

Kwazulu Natal boasts a sub-tropical climate with hot humid summers, dry mild winters and year round sunshine. The biggest city, and the most common gateway to the region, is Durban, an Indian-influenced harbour city and a popular surfing spot. The Art-deco, Indian and Colonial architecture bears evidence to the influences which have helped create this fascinating hub.

Inland, the KwaZulu-Natal Midland’s pastoral scenes of rolling hills, farms and country estates are interspersed with quaint villages and the occasional large town steeped in history. An artists’ paradise, the area is rich in local crafts and art galleries which form the charming Midlands Meander.  Nearby historic significant Pietermaritzburg, the  province’s capital, is also well worth visiting.

The Zulus have long captured the popular imagination of the West and remain one of the province’s major drawcards, integral to some of South Africa’s most turbulent history. The legacy of the Zulu Kingdom’s critical, blood-soaked conflicts lives peacefully today, reconciled in this fascinating region’s myriad Battlefield sites, historic towns, national monuments and museums and in HQs of the British regiments who make a ‘pilgrimage’ to these fields of bravery and supreme sacrifice.

Often forgotten as a safari destination, KwaZulu Natal’s game sanctuaries epitomise the best of the African wilderness. This is one of the few places where good game-viewing can be enjoyed in close proximity to scuba diving and deep-sea fishing. Habitats from coastal dune forests to open bushveld support a wide diversity of wildlife, from the elephant to the tiny suni and bird life is equally prolific. Hluhluwe–Imfolozi Park is the oldest proclaimed nature reserve in Africa, and there are also a number of private reserves, such as Thanda and Phinda, which offer fantastic Big Five safaris whilst staying in luxury camps or lodges.

Eastern Cape

Birthplace of many of the country’s big names, Mandela, Hani, Biko and Sisulu, the Eastern Cape reaches from a coastal region of pristine beaches and forests, to the arid desert landscape of the Karoo. Undulating hills, euphorbia and bushy Cape scrub are distinctive, along with brightly coloured Xhosa houses. Glorious fynbos sweeps across fields which overlook pristine seas.

The starting point for many is the sleepy town of Port Elizabeth, known as the ‘Friendly City’ or Nelson Mandela Bay, which also serves as the end point for many of those coming off Garden Route tours. P.E is a major sea port and as the landing site of the 1820 settlers is richly steeped in culture and history.

The main draw for most visitors to this region is the Eastern Cape’s excellent game reserves, both private and national.  One of the main advantages is that they are malaria free, making it very popular choice for families.

Named for the gentle giants which dominate the reserve, Addo Elephant National Park is an elephant haven, and South Africa’s 3rd largest National Park. Private concessions within the Park allow luxury lodges to operate independently, providing exclusive safaris within the reserve itself.

For the most exclusive Eastern Cape safari, there are a number of  highly regarded private game reserves, set amidst the coastal bushveld and rolling hills and valleys of the Eastern Cape. These include reclaimed lands created through mergers of private farms, exclusive hideaways and vast expanses located in the heart of frontier territory. Shamwari and Kwandwe are the largest of the private reserves and offer superb Big Five safaris, with a range of luxury lodges and private houses, ideal for families and couples alike.

Travelling inland and away from the lushness of the coastal bushveld, the scenery changes. The terrain becomes semi-desert scrubland with breath-taking open plains, vast skies and exquisite sunsets. Here, Samara Private Game Reserve offers a fantastic wilderness and wildlife safari with an array of activities from tracking wild cheetah and sleep outs to wilderness picnics and game drives. It is a paradise for children.

Step back in time when you visit the towns time forgot – Graaff-Reinet, Cradock, Nieu Bethesda. Immerse yourself in the pioneering history of farms, forts, steepled churches and the South African artists and writers who have left their mark indelibly carved into this land. The University town of Grahamstown hosts the annual Arts Festival and the Observatory Museum bursts with fascinating Victorian-era memorabilia.

Madikwe & The Waterberg

In the north of South Africa bordering Botswana, The Madikwe Game Reserve is an hour’s flight from Johannesburg, while the Waterberg Biosphere is a three hour scenic drive of Johannesburg.  Both these scenic wilderness areas are free of malaria and are prime wildlife viewing areas, particularly popular with families.

Madikwe Game Reserve is the fifth largest wildlife reserve in South Africa, and is one the sub-continent’s great conservation success stories.  It was established in 1991 from what was formerly over-utilised farmland and today, at 75 000 ha, it is home to a wide diversity of flora and fauna, including the much sought-after Big 5. It also supports a healthy wild dog population which require vast distances on which to roam.

To the East in the Limpopo Province, the Waterberg  is a region of stunning beauty and invaluable archaeological significance. The steep terrain and unique rock formations of the daunting Waterberg Mountain Range lead down through lush forests to picturesque valleys, gorges and savannah grasslands. Like the Madikwe, this is an interesting conservation story and a stunning wilderness area, with the mountains and ravines adding an extra dimension to the beautiful scenery. The area has been designated as a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO.

At the heart of Waterberg Savannah Biosphere Reserve are the highly respected wildlife reserves of Marakele and Welgevonden, both vast swathes of land boast the Big Five together a with a great diversity of other wildlife. Elsewhere in the Waterberg  you’ll find a number of private reserves such as Leobo and the Ant’s Collection, which have no dangerous game and can therefore offer the additional excitement of a wonderful selection of adventure activities, including bush hiking trails, mountain biking, cattle mustering and some of the finest off-the-beaten-track horse riding in South Africa.

Western Cape

It’s hard to choose highlights in the Western Cape for there are very few parts of the province that aren’t utterly gorgeous.

Being the first province to be colonised by Europeans it sits at the bottom of the country, including both the most southerly point on the African continent, Cape Agulhas, and the much more famous Cape of Good Hope where the Indian and Atlantic Oceans meet, just south of Cape Town.

Cape Town, furled around the slopes of Table Mountain, is considered to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world and is usually the first stop of choice on any tour of South Africa. There is enough here to keep you entertained for weeks, from headline sites such as Table Mountain and Robben Island to great museums and historic sights such as Government Avenue, shopping and strolling in Greenmarket Square, Long Street and the V&A Waterfront. There are plenty of fantastic restaurants, craft stalls and buskers to keep you entertained, with regularly spaced cocktail bars to stop you getting thirsty.

South of the city centre, on the Cape Peninsula, the area is filled with fabulous boutique hotels and restaurants, excellent mountain walks and drives such as Chapman’s Peak and Hoerikwaggo Trail. Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, long recognised as one of the finest in the world, show off the full glories of the Cape Floral Kingdom that have made this area a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Around the coast, small towns from Simonstown and Muizenberg to Hout Bay and Kommetjie provide excellent beaches, surfing, seafood restaurants and rummaging in antique and craft shops. And don’t forget to stop at Boulders Beach to hang out with the penguins.

Just inland of Cape Town, the rolling hills have been upholstered in vines. A trio of historic towns – Stellenbosch, Franschhoek and Paarl – stand at the heart of the Cape Winelands. Wine tastings are obviously a huge part of the Winelands experience, but there is so much more. Whether you want to pamper yourself with gourmet cuisine, a spa break or a round of golf, go hot air ballooning or horse riding through a Big 5 game reserve, these are all possible.

Beyond the Winelands rise the jagged Cederbergs, their cliffs and caves a natural art gallery decorated by the San for thousands of years.

Garden Route

Conveniently accessible from Cape Town, the Garden Route is famous for its hardy fynbos floral kingdom, its secluded little bays and its year-round holiday frame of mind.

Stretching from Heidelberg in the Western Cape to the Storms River in the extreme western reach of the neighbouring Eastern Cape, the name derives from the verdant and ecologically diverse vegetation encountered and the numerous lagoons and lakes dotted along the coast.

The main arterial highway of the Garden Route is the N2 which passes through towns such as Mossel Bay, Knysna, Oudtshoorn, Plettenberg Bay and Nature’s Valley and George, the Garden Route’s largest city and main administrative centre.

Ten nature reserves embrace the varied ecosystems of the area as well as unique marine reserves, home to soft coral reefs, bottlenose and common dolphin, seals and a host of other marine life including killer whales that frolic close to shore, especially near Plettenberg Bay. Various other bays along the Garden Route are nurseries to the endangered Southern Right Whale which come there to calve in the winter and spring (July to December).

Greater Kruger

The Greater Kruger is not only renowned for its diversity of wildlife, but also for its conservation record. You can see the famed Big 5, but you’ll also be dazzled by hundreds of birds, ancient trees, mighty rivers and much, much more.

Stretching 360km from north to south, the Kruger National Park is almost the size of Wales and the surrounding areas of unfenced game reserves include the famous Sabi Sands with some of South Africas most exclusive lodges, as well as the Timbavati, Makalali and Thornybush Reserves.

Sharing the wilderness with you are over 100,000 impala, 10,000 blue wildebeest, 9,000 kudu, 5,000 warthog, 25,000 zebra, 180 cheetah, over 1,000 leopard and 1,500 lions, and that’s just the start.

The Greater Kruger enjoys a great year-round sunny climate and offers all kinds of activities, from guided game drives and bush walks with an armed ranger to three night walking trails in deep wilderness areas.

KwaZulu Natal

Known as the Kingdom of the Zulu, KwaZulu Natal is a melting pot of African, European and Indian cultures.  The province stretches from the Drakensburg Mountains in the northwest to humid, sub-tropical coast in the southeast and boasts two World Heritage Sites, the iSimangaliso Wetland Park and the majestic Ukhahlamba-Drakensberg Park.  The battlefields of Zululand are filled with history, while the golden sandy beaches of Maputaland, in the far northeast, stretch for 200km along this glorious piece of coastline.

Kwazulu Natal boasts a sub-tropical climate with hot humid summers, dry mild winters and year round sunshine. The biggest city, and the most common gateway to the region, is Durban, an Indian-influenced harbour city and a popular surfing spot. The Art-deco, Indian and Colonial architecture bears evidence to the influences which have helped create this fascinating hub.

Inland, the KwaZulu-Natal Midland’s pastoral scenes of rolling hills, farms and country estates are interspersed with quaint villages and the occasional large town steeped in history. An artists’ paradise, the area is rich in local crafts and art galleries which form the charming Midlands Meander.  Nearby historic significant Pietermaritzburg, the  province’s capital, is also well worth visiting.

The Zulus have long captured the popular imagination of the West and remain one of the province’s major drawcards, integral to some of South Africa’s most turbulent history. The legacy of the Zulu Kingdom’s critical, blood-soaked conflicts lives peacefully today, reconciled in this fascinating region’s myriad Battlefield sites, historic towns, national monuments and museums and in HQs of the British regiments who make a ‘pilgrimage’ to these fields of bravery and supreme sacrifice.

Often forgotten as a safari destination, KwaZulu Natal’s game sanctuaries epitomise the best of the African wilderness. This is one of the few places where good game-viewing can be enjoyed in close proximity to scuba diving and deep-sea fishing. Habitats from coastal dune forests to open bushveld support a wide diversity of wildlife, from the elephant to the tiny suni and bird life is equally prolific. Hluhluwe–Imfolozi Park is the oldest proclaimed nature reserve in Africa, and there are also a number of private reserves, such as Thanda and Phinda, which offer fantastic Big Five safaris whilst staying in luxury camps or lodges.

Eastern Cape

Birthplace of many of the country’s big names, Mandela, Hani, Biko and Sisulu, the Eastern Cape reaches from a coastal region of pristine beaches and forests, to the arid desert landscape of the Karoo. Undulating hills, euphorbia and bushy Cape scrub are distinctive, along with brightly coloured Xhosa houses. Glorious fynbos sweeps across fields which overlook pristine seas.

The starting point for many is the sleepy town of Port Elizabeth, known as the ‘Friendly City’ or Nelson Mandela Bay, which also serves as the end point for many of those coming off Garden Route tours. P.E is a major sea port and as the landing site of the 1820 settlers is richly steeped in culture and history.

The main draw for most visitors to this region is the Eastern Cape’s excellent game reserves, both private and national.  One of the main advantages is that they are malaria free, making it very popular choice for families.

Named for the gentle giants which dominate the reserve, Addo Elephant National Park is an elephant haven, and South Africa’s 3rd largest National Park. Private concessions within the Park allow luxury lodges to operate independently, providing exclusive safaris within the reserve itself.

For the most exclusive Eastern Cape safari, there are a number of  highly regarded private game reserves, set amidst the coastal bushveld and rolling hills and valleys of the Eastern Cape. These include reclaimed lands created through mergers of private farms, exclusive hideaways and vast expanses located in the heart of frontier territory. Shamwari and Kwandwe are the largest of the private reserves and offer superb Big Five safaris, with a range of luxury lodges and private houses, ideal for families and couples alike.

Travelling inland and away from the lushness of the coastal bushveld, the scenery changes. The terrain becomes semi-desert scrubland with breath-taking open plains, vast skies and exquisite sunsets. Here, Samara Private Game Reserve offers a fantastic wilderness and wildlife safari with an array of activities from tracking wild cheetah and sleep outs to wilderness picnics and game drives. It is a paradise for children.

Step back in time when you visit the towns time forgot – Graaff-Reinet, Cradock, Nieu Bethesda. Immerse yourself in the pioneering history of farms, forts, steepled churches and the South African artists and writers who have left their mark indelibly carved into this land. The University town of Grahamstown hosts the annual Arts Festival and the Observatory Museum bursts with fascinating Victorian-era memorabilia.

Madikwe & The Waterberg

In the north of South Africa bordering Botswana, The Madikwe Game Reserve is an hour’s flight from Johannesburg, while the Waterberg Biosphere is a three hour scenic drive of Johannesburg.  Both these scenic wilderness areas are free of malaria and are prime wildlife viewing areas, particularly popular with families.

Madikwe Game Reserve is the fifth largest wildlife reserve in South Africa, and is one the sub-continent’s great conservation success stories.  It was established in 1991 from what was formerly over-utilised farmland and today, at 75 000 ha, it is home to a wide diversity of flora and fauna, including the much sought-after Big 5. It also supports a healthy wild dog population which require vast distances on which to roam.

To the East in the Limpopo Province, the Waterberg  is a region of stunning beauty and invaluable archaeological significance. The steep terrain and unique rock formations of the daunting Waterberg Mountain Range lead down through lush forests to picturesque valleys, gorges and savannah grasslands. Like the Madikwe, this is an interesting conservation story and a stunning wilderness area, with the mountains and ravines adding an extra dimension to the beautiful scenery. The area has been designated as a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO.

At the heart of Waterberg Savannah Biosphere Reserve are the highly respected wildlife reserves of Marakele and Welgevonden, both vast swathes of land boast the Big Five together a with a great diversity of other wildlife. Elsewhere in the Waterberg  you’ll find a number of private reserves such as Leobo and the Ant’s Collection, which have no dangerous game and can therefore offer the additional excitement of a wonderful selection of adventure activities, including bush hiking trails, mountain biking, cattle mustering and some of the finest off-the-beaten-track horse riding in South Africa.

Where to stay

These are just a selection of the properties we can personally recommend. Please get in touch to hear more about our full portfolio.

Ant’s Hill

Ants Hill is perched on an escarpment, on its own private reserve in the malaria-free Waterberg Biosphere. With spectacular views of the Waterberg plateau and mountains beyond, this gorgeous bush home is owner run and very family-friendly, priding itself on its relaxed ambiance and flexible approach to activities and mealtimes.

take me to Ant’s Hill

Babylonstoren

Babylonstoren is a working wine and fruit farm in the glorious Drakenstein Valley between Franschhoek and Stellenbosch. Lovely white-washed Cape Dutch buildings form the exteriors, while the interiors showcase a combination of heritage and modern living.

take me to Babylonstoren

Belmond Mount Nelson Hotel

Set at the foot of Table Mountain, in the heart of the City Bowl, the iconic Belmond Mount Nelson, fondly known as the Cape Towns’ Pink Lady due to her pink facade,  opened her doors in 1899 and has been welcoming loyal guests ever since.

take me to Belmond Mount Nelson Hotel

Birkenhead House

Birkenhead House is an Hermanus hotel in an enviable location atop the rugged cliffs of the Cape Coast, giving it dazzling ocean views and easy access to the beach. Birkenhead House is the epitome of contemporary beach house cool: modern, stylish and visually stunning.

take me to Birkenhead House

Bushman’s Kloof

Bushman’s Kloof, situated in the foothills of the Cederberg Mountains less than four hours drive from Cape Town, is an exclusive private wilderness reserve and wellness retreat. Vast and ruggedly beautiful, this semi-desert eco reserve is both malaria and predator free and boasts sites of exceptional Bushman rock art.

take me to Bushman’s Kloof

Cape Cadogan Boutique Hotel

Cape Cadogan Boutique Hotel is authentic Cape Town at its loveliest, with sophisticated charm, and quirky personality in equal measure. Set just off the buzzing Kloof Street, you can live like a local and still be treated as a guest.

take me to Cape Cadogan Boutique Hotel

Chitwa Chitwa

After its classic transformation into an eclectic blend of European style with African chic, Chitwa Chitwa has emerged as an exquisite balance between unbridled luxury and environmental harmony, an oasis of conservation.

take me to Chitwa Chitwa

Delaire Graff

Delaire Graff Estate is surrounded by sweeping views across stunning vineyards and mountains towards Stellenbosch, one of the world’s leading wine destinations. The ten sumptuously decorated lodges, each with their own private plunge pool, invite complete relaxation in an idyllic setting.

take me to Delaire Graff

Ellerman House

Once the stately home of Sir John and Lady Ellerman, distinguished shipping magnates and investors, Ellerman House sits perched on the slopes of Lion’s Head in the prestigious Bantry Bay residential area. This elegant Cape Edwardian mansion is known for having one of the most spectacular ocean views in South Africa.

take me to Ellerman House

Fugitives’ Drift Lodge

Fugitives’ Drift, set in a 5000 acre game reserve with 22 km of river frontage, is a place where the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879 is brought back to life. Overlooking both Isandlwana and Rorke’s Drift, the reserve includes the site where Lieutenants Melvill and Coghill lost their lives attempting to save the Queen’s Colour of their regiment.

take me to Fugitives’ Drift Lodge

Grootbos Private Nature Reserve

Nestled between the mountains and sea, two hours from Cape Town, Grootbos Private Game Reserve is a superb family-run nature reserve set amongst rollings hills of flynbos overlooking the stunning coastline of Walker Bay. Home to the “Marine Big 5” – whales, sharks, dolphins, seals and penguins; and with unparalleled floral diversity, Grootbos offers you a one-of-a-kind luxury African experience.

take me to Grootbos Private Nature Reserve

Hog Hollow Country Lodge

Hog Hollow Country Lodge is perched above the dramatic Matjies River Gorge, at the Crags, a short distance inland from Plettenberg Bay on South Africa’s Garden Route.

take me to Hog Hollow Country Lodge

Kwandwe Ecca Lodge

Set within the vast 22,000 hectare Kwandwe Private Game Reserve, Kwandwe Ecca Lodge offers arguably the best family friendly Big Five safari in South Africa’s Eastern Cape. Innovative, stylish and intimate, Ecca Lodge has just six expansive suites with wraparound decks, complete with private plunge pools and outdoor showers

take me to Kwandwe Ecca Lodge

La Residence

Located in the beautiful Franschhoek Valley on a private 30 acre wine farm, La Residence sets the benchmark for luxury accommodation in the Cape Winelands.  

take me to La Residence

Leobo Private Reserve

Leobo Private Reserve is situated in the Waterberg region of South Africa, a 12,000-acre malaria-free reserve overlooking the Palala Valley. It is home to two spectacular private houses, The Observatory & the Lodge, which are both booked on an exclusive use basis. Guests can enjoy an remarkable array of activities, all arranged for them at the drop of a hat.

take me to Leobo Private Reserve

Lion Sands Ivory Lodge

The Lion Sands lodges, including Ivory lodge, are set along the banks of the perennial Sabie River, and each have breath-taking views – no one more inspiring than the next. Every day, the appearance of animals at the water’s edge presents you with a natural theatre.

take me to Lion Sands Ivory Lodge

Marataba Safari Camp

Marataba is located in a 23,000 hectare private concession adjoining the vast, malarial-free Marakele National Park with dramatic views of the Waterberg escarpment.

take me to Marataba Safari Camp

Molori Safari Lodge

The word “Molori” means “to dream” in Tswana and truly captures the essence of Molori Safari Lodge, recognized throughout the world as Southern Africa’s most luxurious game lodge. Molori combines local décor and design with international style.

take me to Molori Safari Lodge

Phinda Rock Lodge

Dramatically set into a cliff face overlooking spectacular Leopard Rock, Phinda Rock Lodge is an intimate and quirky lodge located within the vast Phinda Private Game Reserve, Kwazulu Natal’s most exclusive safari destination.

take me to Phinda Rock Lodge

Royal Madikwe

Contemporary style blends with African elegance at Royal Madikwe Lodge set in the western sector of the famed Madikwe Game Reserve overlooking a busy waterhole. With just four Suites, plus the Royal Villa and Sovereign House, this intimate lodge lives up to its regal name, offering luxurious accommodation, sincere hospitality and top notch wildlife encounters.

take me to Royal Madikwe

Royal Malewane

Royal Malewane is situated in the Thornybush Private Game Reserve that forms part of the Greater Kruger. Luxury meets the wild in some of South Africa’s finest safari accommodation exuding the beauty of a bygone age while offering every modern comfort. The expert guiding team delivers an intimate wildlife experience with close sightings of the big five.

take me to Royal Malewane

Samara Private Game Reserve

Surrounded by a natural amphitheatre of mountains, Samara Private Game Reserve sits in 67,000 acres of pristine malaria-free wilderness in South Africa’s Eastern Cape, just 2.5 hours by car from Port Elizabeth,

take me to Samara Private Game Reserve

Tanda Tula Safari Camp

Tanda Tula Safari Camp is located in the heart of the Timbavati Private Nature Reserve, forming part of the Greater Kruger National Park. This East-African camp is unique, being both owner run and one of the few tented bush camps in the area, offering a luxurious yet authentic safari experience.

take me to Tanda Tula Safari Camp

The Blue Train

The Blue Train combines five-star accommodation with the charm and romance of train travel. Take a journey into a timeless world of grace and elegance, where breath-taking scenery stirs your imagination and luxurious comfort soothes body and soul. Sit back and enjoy being pampered on South Africa’s “Blue Jewel”.

take me to The Blue Train

The Oyster Box

Standing proud on Umhlanga’s beachfront, a pretty suburb of Durban, The Oyster Box first opened its doors way back in 1947. The combination of colonial charm, impeccable service, lush tropical gardens and breath-taking coastal setting quickly earned it a fantastic reputation.

take me to The Oyster Box

The Plettenberg

Laidback yet effortlessly chic, The Plettenberg is perched on the rocky headland overlooking endless stretches of pristine coastline and the majestic Outeniqua Mountains.

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Thonga Beach Lodge

Thonga Beach Lodge is set above a secluded bay and nestled into the indigenous coastal dune forest of the KwaZulu Natal’s Maputuland coast. This rustic luxury lodge is the ideal place to discover one of South Africa’s last unspoilt wilderness beaches.

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Tuningi Safari Lodge

Tuningi Safari Lodge is a family-friendly lodge located in the heart of the Madikwe Game Reserve, a malaria-free big five reserve easily accessible from Johannesburg. With endless views over pristine bushveld, best appreciated from the wrap-around decks, this property is both intimate and tranquil.

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